Associated Press Stylebook

Adapted for the Jones Graduate School of Business and Rice University

 

Jones School-Specific Stylebook Guide

School name formal: Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business and Jones Graduate School of Business (in first use)

School name informal: Jones School and JGSB (if first use shows the acronym, such as: Jones Graduate School of Business (JGSB))

Punctuation: MBA never has periods. MAcc never has periods. Ph.D. does. Undergraduate degrees do, such as B.A. or B.S.

Program names:

  • Rice MBA (when referring to the MBA degree program in general, alumni who have earned their MBA (not MAcc or Ph.D.)
  • Rice MBA Full Time. Full Time is capped when used with Rice MBA before it, but nowhere else. Only use a hyphen between full and time when it’s a modifier
    • He was accepted into the full-time program.
    • The full-time curriculum has changed over the years.
     
  • Rice MBA for Professionals, MBAP, Rice MBA for Professionals – Weekend; MBAP-W; Rice MBA for Professionals – Evening; MBAP-E
    • He was accepted into the professional program.
     
  • Rice MBA for Executives, EMBA
    • He was accepted into the executive program.
     
  • Rice Ph.D. in Business, Ph.D.
  • Rice University Executive Education, RUEE
  • Rice University Educational Entrepreneurship Program, REEP
  • Master of Accounting, MAcc

Alumni: Rice MBAs when referring only to MBAs. Because many of our alumni are MAccs and now Ph.D.s, use Jones School alumni and alumni when referring (see below for full use of plural, singular, male and female)

Council of Overseers: When “Jones School” or “Jones Graduate School of Business” appears in front of “council of overseers,” capitalize the “c” and “o.” On second reference or when referring to the board informally, use lowercase.

  • The Jones School Council of Overseers met on Thursday.
  • The council of overseers came to a decision.
  • James Turley is on the council.

Building: McNair Hall, Janice and Robert McNair Hall

Titles: Capitalize formal titles before a name and do not separate a title from the name with a comma. Titles that appear after a name or standing alone are almost never capitalized.

  • I met Dean Bill Glick at the reception.
  • Bill Glick, dean of the Jones School, issued a statement.

Faculty are the same.

  • Associate Professor of Finance Brian Rountree earned his Ph.D. from the University of North Carolina.
  • Brian Rountree, associate professor of finance, has received several teaching awards.

If the faculty member has an endowed position, capitalize the title whether it appears before or after the name and place “the” before the title. If the faculty member has a secondary appointment that is not endowed, do not capitalize that portion of the title.

  • Kerry Back, the J. Howard Creekmore Professor of Finance, previously served on the faculty of several universities.

The following formal titles are capitalized and abbreviated when used before a name: Dr., Gov., Lt. Gov., Rep., Sen. and certain military ranks.

Do not include “Dr.” before the name or “Ph.D.” after the name. (This does not apply to letters and memos.)

Web Addresses: Do not use http or www preceding a web URL. 

  • business.rice.edu is the correct format. 

 

Rice-Specific Stylebook Guide


Academic Departments: For academic and administrative departments, Rice follows the AP style described for government departments. When the name refers to the department, it's capitalized; when the name refers to the generic discipline or field, it's lowercased.

  • The Department of Physics and Astronomy is sponsoring the lecture by Anthony Chan, professor of physics and astronomy.
  • Information Technology announced its reorganization around newly developed human resources principles.
  • Human Resources announced that Rice was chosen again as one of Houston's Best Places to Work.
  • The chemistry class was extended to include information technology topics.

Addresses: Follow AP style for addresses, with this additional guidance for Rice internal communications: Use numerals for room numbers, and capitalize "room" when it appears with a number or as part of a name. Mail stops should be formatted as "MS xxx" with an en dash preceding MS.

  • The lecture will be held in Room 102, Rayzor Hall.
  • Mail your AP style questions to News and Media Relations-MS 300, 200 Allen Center.

Alumna, Alumnus, Alumni: An “alumna” is a female graduate. An “alumnus” is a male graduate. “Alumni” refers to a group of male or a group of male and female graduates. “Alumnae” refers to a group of female graduates. The last two digits of a graduate’s commencement year, preceded by an apostrophe, should appear after the first reference to the full name. If the alum has more than one degree, use the year the first degree was awarded.

  • Rice alumna Jane Doe ’59 was quoted in the story.

Awards, Prizes, Contests: Capitalize the proper name of awards, prizes and contests, using the full name on first reference. If a shortened version of the name is used on subsequent references, lowercase the name.

  • John Doe, professor of sociology, won the Joseph H. King Award for Excellence in Teaching. The King award includes a $10,000 stipend.
  • The Houston Business Journal (HBJ) publishes its annual list, Houston's Best Places to Work, in June. HBJ's list of Houston's best places to work is a popular award.

Board of Trustees: When “Rice” or “Rice University” appears in front of “board of trustees,” capitalize each word. On second reference or when referring to the board informally, use lowercase. Same goes for Council of Overseers.

  • The board of trustees passed a resolution.
  • The Rice Board of Trustees announced its support for higher education.
  • The Jones School Council of Overseers met on Thursday. The council of overseers came to a decision.

Buildings: Use the full name of a building on first reference. A shortened form of the name is acceptable on second reference if it does not cause confusion. Especially avoid using “Brown” alone, since there are three Brown Halls and one Brown College.

  • A reception will be held in the lobby of Anne and Charles Duncan Hall. Duncan Hall is located on the east side of campus just north of Herzstein Hall.
  • Classes will be held in George R. Brown Hall, followed by lunch in the Brown College Commons and then a concert in Alice Pratt Brown Hall.

Centennial Campaign: Was the official name of Rice’s $1 billion fundraising campaign. If it is referred to as “the Centennial Campaign,” “the” is NOT capitalized nor is campaign when used without centennial.

  • The Centennial Campaign was launched Nov. 2, 2008, and concluded in June 2013.
  • The successful campaign will enable Rice to train more student leaders and expand its community and international outreach.
  • Centennial Celebration — Was the official name of Rice’s upcoming 100th anniversary. If it is referred to as “the Centennial Celebration,” “the” is NOT capitalized nor is celebration when used without centennial.

Leebron: In news releases and magazine articles, use “Rice University President David Leebron” or “President David Leebron” on first reference and “Leebron” on second reference.

  • For letters, official documents, invitations, speech titles and other formal communication, include his middle initial on first reference: “President David W. Leebron” or “Rice University President David W. Leebron.” Use “President Leebron” on second reference. For some personal letters, “David” would be acceptable on second reference, depending on the context and the audience.

Ping Sun: In news releases and magazine articles, use “Ping Sun” on first reference and “Sun” on second reference. For letters, official documents, invitations, speech titles and other formal communications, use “Y. Ping Sun” on first reference and “Ms. Sun” on second reference. For some personal letters, “Ping” would be acceptable on second reference, depending on the context and the audience.

  • Ping’s official title at Rice is “university representative.” It’s also acceptable to identify her as “the wife of President David Leebron.”

Rice Academic Titles: Follow AP style for capitalization of academic titles, with these exceptions:

Do not include “Dr.” before the name or “Ph.D.” after the name. (This does not apply to letters and memos.) Use the person’s academic title as listed in General Announcements. If the faculty member has an endowed position, capitalize the title whether it appears before or after the name and place “the” before the title. If the faculty member has a secondary appointment that is not endowed, do not capitalize that portion of the title.

  • Lydia Kavraki, the Noah Harding Professor of Computer Science and professor of bioengineering, received a grant from the National Science Foundation.

Student–Athlete: Join this compound noun with an en dash.

University: When referring to “the university,” do not capitalize “university.”

Vision for the Second Century: Do not use “2nd.” The abbreviation “V2C” is acceptable on second reference.

Who Knew: When referring to the campaign, capitalize “Who Knew.” When writing a question for the campaign, “knew” is lowercased.

  • Submit your idea for Rice’s “Who Knew?” campaign.
  • Who knew pondering a malted milk ball could lead to a cancer cure?

Years: When discussing the school year or fiscal year, it is acceptable to use 2007–2008 or 2007–08, separated by an en dash.


AP Stylebook Guide


Academic Degrees: Put an apostrophe in bachelor’s degree and master’s degree.

  • Even when shortened to: He earned his master’s at Rice University.

Academic Departments: Lowercase except for words that are proper nouns or adjectives

  • The department of engineering, the history department or the English department.
  • When department is part of the official and formal name, it should be capped: Rice University’s Department of Engineering.

Academic Titles: Capitalize and spell out formal titles such as chancellor or chairman etc. when they precede a name. Lowercase elsewhere.

  • Dean Bill Glick
  • Bill Glick, dean of the Jones Graduate School of Business

Addresses: Abbreviate the words: street, avenue and boulevard, plus compass directions only if they appear after a numbered address.

  • 6100 Main St.
  • 1215 E. Crystal Lake Ave.

If the street number is omitted, do not abbreviate.

  • Their office is on Main Street in Houston.

a.m., p.m.: Lowercase with periods. Use figures except for noon and midnight.

  • Breakfast will take place at 9:30 a.m., and lunch will be at noon.

Dates: Always use Arabic figures without st, nd, rd or th.

  • The event is scheduled for August 29, 2014.

Dimensions: Use figures for all numbers that indicate height, weight, width, etc. even for numbers less than 10.

  • The book weighs 2 pounds.

Directions and Regions: In general, lowercase north, south, northern, northeast etc., when they indicate compass direction. Cap when they designate regions.

  • He drove west
  • I am walking north.
  • The front will bring showers to the East Coast by morning.

Dollars: Always lowercase. Use figures and the $ sign in all except casual references or amount without a figure

  • The book cost $4.
  • Can you please lend me a dollar?

For specified amounts, the word takes a singular verb.

  • He said $500,000 is what they want.

For amounts more than a million, use the $ and numerals up to two decimal points.

  • It’s worth $4.25 million
  • It’s worth exactly $4,251,242.

Do not link numerals and the word with a hyphen.

  • He proposed a $300 million budget.

E-mail: Use a hyphen. Also, e-book, e-commerce, e-business.

Emeritus: When used, place emeritus after the formal title.

  • University Professor Emeritus Bob Curl
  • Bub Curl, professor emeritus of chemistry

Fractions: Spell out amounts less than "1" in copy and use hyphens between the words.

  • two-thirds, four-fifths, seven-sixteenths

Governmental Bodies: Capitalize the full proper names of governmental agencies, departments and offices.

  • The U.S. Department of State, the Georgia Department of
  • Human Resources, the Boston City Council or the Chicago Fire Department

Inc.: Do not precede it with a comma

Internet: Cap.

Junior, Senior: Abbreviate as “Jr.” or “Sr.” only with full names. Do NOT precede with a comma.

Laws: Capitalize legislative acts but not bills.

  • theTaft Hartley Act, the Kennedy bill

Magazine Titles: Capitalize the initial letters of the name but do not place it in quotes. Lowercase “magazine” unless it is part of the publication’s formal title.

  • Harper’s Magazine, Newsweek magazine, TIME magazine

Military Branches: Capitalize the branches of the military when referring to U.S. forces. Use lowercase for the forces of other nations.

  • U.S. Air Force, the Israeli air force

Military Titles: Capitalize a military rank when used as a formal title before an individual's name. On first reference, use the appropriate title. In subsequent references, use only the last name.

  • Gen. John J. Smith arrived today. Smith said he was glad to be here.

Millions, Billions: Use figures with "million" and "billion" in all except casual uses.

  • The nation has 1 million citizens. I'd like to make a billion dollars.

Months: Capitalize the names of months in all uses. When a month is used with a specific date, abbreviate only “Jan.,” “Feb.,” “Aug.,” “Sept.,” “Oct.,” “Nov.” and “Dec.” Spell out when using alone or with a year. When a phrase lists a month and a year, do not separate it with a comma.

  • January 1972 was a cold month.
  • Jan. 2 was the coldest day.
  • Feb. 14, 1987, was the target date.

Numerals: Spell out whole numbers below 10. Use figures for 10 and above.

  • They had three sons and two daughters. They had a fleet of 10 station wagons and two buses.

Spell out a numeral at the beginning of a sentence unless the number identifies a calendar year.

  • Twenty-two people attended the presentation. 1966 was a very good year.

RSVP: Do not use periods to separate.

State Names: Spell out names of states in sentences when they stand alone in textual material. The names of eight states are NEVER abbreviated in datelines or text: Alaska, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Maine, Ohio, Texas and Utah.

  • I relocated to Texas from Pennsylvania.

Place one comma between the city and the state name and another comma after the state name unless ending a sentence.

  • He was traveling from Nashville, Tenn., to Austin, Texas, en route to his home in Albuquerque, N.M.
  • Use “New York state” when necessary to distinguish the state from New York City. Use “state of Washington” or “Washington state” when necessary to distinguish the state from the District of Columbia.

Time Sequences: Spell out.

  • The fundraiser lasted 50 hours, 23 minutes, 14 seconds.

When using the abbreviated form as in sports statistics the form is hours, minutes, seconds, tenths, hundredths.

  • 2:30:21.65

Titles — Capitalize formal titles before a name and do not separate a title from the name with a comma. Titles that appear after a name or standing alone are almost never capitalized.

  • I met President David Leebron at the reception. The president issued a statement.
  • The following formal titles are capitalized and abbreviated when used before a name: Dr., Gov., Lt. Gov., Rep., Sen. and certain military ranks.

United States: It is acceptable to abbreviate it as “U.S.” when used as an adjective or a noun.

  • U.S. hockey team, U.S. economy and U.S. savings bonds
  • I love the United States.

World Wide Web: Capitalize the full name in copy. The “Web” is acceptable. Use “website” and “Web page” BUT “webcam,” “webcast” and “webmaster.”

ZIP Code: Use all caps for “ZIP” but always lowercase the word “code.” Run the five digits together and do not put a comma between the state name and the ZIP code.

  • Houston, TX 77005

Specific AP Stylebook Punctuation Rules


Comma: Leave out the comma before the conjunction in a series unless the sentence is confusing without it.

  • Rice students are smart, progressive and successful. BUT: Her favorite sandwiches are pastrami, ham, cream cheese and peanut butter and jelly. (Is one of her favorite snacks a “cream cheese and peanut butter” sandwich or a “peanut butter and jelly” sandwich?) A serial comma would help prevent this confusion.
  • This sentence, correctly punctuated, should read: “Her favorite sandwiches are pastrami, ham, cream cheese, and peanut butter and jelly.”

Dash: There are two types of dashes: the en dash and the em dash. The en dash is roughly the width of the capital letter "N," and the em dash is roughly the width of the capital letter "M."

Use the en dash when you're talking about a range of numerical values, such as a finite amount of time.

  • 1-2 p.m. or Pages 33-55

However, be sure not to use the en dash if the dates, times or other numerical values are preceded by the words "from" or "between." In these cases, spell out the word in the middle.

  • President Leebron will be there from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dean Hutchinson said that between 10 and 20 students will be selected.

Use an em dash with a space on either side to indicate an abrupt change in thought or an emphatic pause in a sentence.

  • Every student would drink coffee — if they could get it for free.

You should also use the em dash to set off a phrase that contains a series of words that must be separated by commas.

  • She listed the qualities — intelligence, humor, diligence, honesty — that she liked in an employee.

Ellipsis ( … ): Use an ellipses to indicate the deletion of one or more words in a phrase or sentence. In general, treat it as a three-letter word, constructed with three periods and two spaces.

  • He … tried to do what was best.

If the words that precede an ellipsis constitute a grammatically complete sentence, either in the original or in the condensation, place a period at the end of the last word before the ellipsis.

  • I no longer have enough office space. …

When grammatical sense calls for a question mark, exclamation point, comma or colon, follow a similar sequence.

  • Will you come? …

An ellipsis also may be used to indicate a pause or hesitation in speech or a thought that the speaker or writer does not complete. Substitute a dash for this purpose, however, if the context uses ellipses to indicate that words actually spoken or written have been deleted.

  • Juan and Marcy thought and thought … and then thought some more. BUT: Juan … thought and thought — and then thought some more.

Hyphen: Use hyphens whenever not using them would cause confusion.

  • He recovered the football. BUT He re-covered the roof.

When two or more words that work together to express a single concept precede a noun, that word group is called a compound modifier. Use hyphens to link all the words in a compound modifier except the adverb "very" and all adverbs that end in "-ly."

  • The little-known doctor spoke. (Did you catch yourself expecting a noun after the word "little"? That's one way to know there should be a hyphen between the words "little" and "known.")

Quotation Marks: The period and the comma always go within the quotation marks.

  • "I am happy to be here," he said. He said he was "happy to be here."

If a full paragraph of quoted material is followed by a paragraph that continues the quotation, do not put close-quote marks at the end of the first paragraph. Do, however, put open-quote marks at the start of the second paragraph, and use close-quote marks at the end of the quoted material.

"I am honored to be here sharing these AP style guidelines with you.

"I am so honored, in fact, that I will speak for an additional hour."